In June of 2020, Chattanooga 2.0 released a statement committing to put equity at the center of our work to impact strong educational outcomes in Hamilton County. Around the globe and in our own community, the topic of equity and specifically racial justice is top of mind for many. Today, we find ourselves in an important moment. Now is the time to set common definitions around equity and begin a productive community conversation about how we ensure that in Chattanooga and Hamilton County, one’s future success is not determined by zip code, background, or skin color.

Chattanooga 2.0 defines educational equity as intentional supports, resources, and policies designed to meet the individual needs of each learner and eliminate disparities in outcomes, ultimately ensuring that all students have the opportunity to unlock their full potential.

Equity is different from equality. Equity recognizes that each individual will need unique supports to cross the same finish line. While equality implies that everyone should be given the exact same supports in the same amounts.

In a step towards starting community conversations, we posed five questions on the topic of educational equity to the 2021 Chattanooga Mayoral candidates. We believe that engaging public leaders in this conversation and equipping the community with the information they need to make informed decisions is essential to the work.

But it’s just one step. We invite you and/or your organization to join us in the important work that lies ahead.

2021 Chattanooga Mayoral Candidates on Educational Equity

Q: Do you believe educational equity, as defined by Chattanooga 2.0, should be a priority for the City of Chattanooga? If yes, what does that commitment look like in action?

A: Educational equity should absolutely be a priority for the City of Chattanooga.  We must invest enough resources in each school to bring every school to a high-performing level.  It is not enough to give all schools equal resources.  This would just keep some schools mired in a perpetual cycle of under-performance.  As Mayor, I will partner with public schools within our city limits to provide free public transportation, life/career counselors for middle school students, and expand early childhood education.

 

Q: What role should the City of Chattanooga, specifically, play in eliminating racial and socioeconomic disparities in resource allocation and access to high-quality learning options for children and youth, from birth to career?

A: First, Chattanooga must commit to pursuing a standard of excellence.  This will include partnering with the JB & MK Pritzker Foundation, the League of Cities, and other thought leaders in Early Childhood Development to identify and develop best practices.  Next, we need to invest heavily in continuing education for teachers. This will let them know that they are supported and will provide new tools and techniques in the classroom.  Finally, resource allocation should be based on achieving equitable outcomes for students. We can’t make the mistake of just giving every school and student an equal slice of the pie.

 

Q: How would you align the work of the City of Chattanooga to support Hamilton County Schools’ efforts to provide an excellent and equitable education to every student?

A: As City Mayor, I will not be the boss of HCDE and public schools, but I have told Superintendent Bryan Johnson that I want the City of Chattanooga to be the very best partner to our schools.  I feel a strong moral obligation to the students of Chattanooga.  My first action as Mayor will be to appoint a liason to HCDE and the public schools within our city limits.  Then we will work with each individual school to identify opportunities for the City to add value. There will be no cookie cutter, one size fits all solutions.

 

Q: The annual economic loss in Chattanooga due to insufficient child care is $74 million. What would you do to address this? 

A: Insufficient childcare is a significant problem in Chattanooga. Two-thirds of all households in poverty are headed by single women.  The majority of Chattanooga’s poverty is concentrated with single moms, their children, and families.  Lack of access to high-quality affordable childcare keeps women trapped in poverty.  We need to replicate services provided by The Chambliss Center and Chattanooga State to provide more options for day, evening, and overnight childcare.  As Mayor, I will convene childcare providers to develop solutions and research models from other cities that might work in Chattanooga.

 

Q: What steps do you support the City of Chattanooga taking to ensure students from low-income backgrounds and students of color have equitable access to out-of-school time programming and enrichment?

A: What is needed is a collaborative effort between our public schools, YFD Centers, and Public Libraries to provide opportunities for equitable access to out-of-school programming and enrichment.  Making CARTA free to ride (with bus stops at every middle and high school) and providing free shuttles between YFD Centers can help improve access.

Q: Do you believe educational equity, as defined by Chattanooga 2.0, should be a priority for the City of Chattanooga? If yes, what does that commitment look like in action? A: Yes, I believe in improving Chattanooga’s education at the root of the problem versus attempting to bandage the issues at hand. Chattanooga funds Hamilton County with over 60% of their budget and this includes education, however, we have the most underserved schools in the system. While the City of Chattanooga is not able to control exactly how Hamilton County utilizes their budget, I believe that more accountability must be placed on Hamilton County to assure that our education system is top priority. Priority must also be placed on eliminating racial disparities in our economy. That is why, as councilman, I implemented Chattanooga’s disparity study so that we may provide more opportunity to people of color, women and veterans. This not only provides more opportunity for parents today, but also helps to create fair opportunity for all of our students to connect to self sustaining careers to successfully transition to the workforce.   Q: What role should the City of Chattanooga, specifically, play in eliminating racial and socioeconomic disparities in resource allocation and access to high-quality learning options for children and youth, from birth to career? A: The first step is to begin with Chattanooga’s disparity study. By starting with the hard numbers, we know exactly the racial and socioeconomic disparities that we face and will allow us the opportunity to assure that more funding goes towards those underserved demographics. I believe that the City of Chattanooga should continue to allocate funding to our existing early childhood education programs such as Baby University and Head Start and implement additional programming to our Youth and Family Development Centers. We must also implement strong leaders into our programs that will provide strong mentorship to assist with transitioning into secondary education.   Q: How would you align the work of the City of Chattanooga to support Hamilton County Schools’ efforts to provide an excellent and equitable education to every student? A: I would continue to assure that our early childhood education programs are properly resourced and funded, so that our students are entering the kindergarten level with the necessary skills for success. In addition to this, the City of Chattanooga would place more accountability on Hamilton County to assure that education milestones are being met within all of our schools.   Q: The annual economic loss in Chattanooga due to insufficient child care is $74 million. What would you do to address this?  A: I believe that our city’s Head Start and early childhood education programs can provide families the assistance of child care with the addition of providing the child with school readiness development.   Q: What steps do you support the City of Chattanooga taking to ensure students from low-income backgrounds and students of color have equitable access to out-of-school time programming and enrichment? A: During my time as councilman, one of my priorities have always been our parks and youth and family development centers. There is a YFD center in most of our neighborhoods and I believe in upholding the integrity and quality of our centers so that they may be a safe haven for our youth, young adults and families.

Q: Do you believe educational equity, as defined by Chattanooga 2.0, should be a priority for the City of Chattanooga? If yes, what does that commitment look like in action?

A: Yes. I believe that addressing inequity is the most pressing challenge for our city. Having grown up on the Westside, I know what it’s like to feel locked out of the city’s progress. As Mayor, I will ensure the City prioritizes equity, not just as an outcome, but as a process for creating a more just and inclusive community. My new Office of Equity and Engagement will be dedicated to employing equity as a core principle in City of Chattanooga policies, operations, and decision-making – so that equitable practices are embedded across all City departments, from the police and public works to Head Start and budgeting. At every level, we will be working to enact policies that directly address disparities and remove barriers, in order to improve the quality of life and increase engagement from historically marginalized communities. 

 

Q: What role should the City of Chattanooga, specifically, play in eliminating racial and socioeconomic disparities in resource allocation and access to high-quality learning options for children and youth, from birth to career?

A: While the City of Chattanooga does not fund or control public K-12 schools, the City does play a significant role in education.  Nearly 1,000 of our youngest residents are enrolled in the City’s Head Start and Early Head Start programs each year and the Office of Early Learning works with many additional programs to increase quality and access.   Through its community centers, the City currently operates one of the largest after school and summer youth programs in Chattanooga. There are many other programs that provide critical support, from the Library, to the Family Justice Center, to Baby University — all of which contribute to the well-being of kids and families across our community. The City must continually work to expand the reach, but also the quality and effectiveness of these programs – always through an equity lens.

 

Q: How would you align the work of the City of Chattanooga to support Hamilton County Schools’ efforts to provide an excellent and equitable education to every student?

A: I will work with HCS leadership to ensure that the City is a strong partner and aligning resources to support our public schools, including: 

  • Expanding and improving public transportation so that more students have access to work and learning opportunities. 
  • Making city government a model for providing expanded high-quality work-based learning and youth apprenticeship opportunities, while encouraging other local employers to do the same. 
  • Collaborating with HCS on the planning and construction for new schools, so that we are fully leveraging City resources to strengthen these critical neighborhood investments. 
  • Expanding the Office of Early Learning and ensure that they collaborate with HCS to make sure that all early learning programs have access to high-quality curriculum that prepares young children for Kindergarten. 
  • Collaborating to address issues around juvenile justice, so that our most at-risk kids get the support they need as soon as possible

 

Q: The annual economic loss in Chattanooga due to insufficient child care is $74 million. What would you do to address this? 

A: I believe that high quality early education is one of the most important investments we can make as a City. I am committed to increasing the City’s investment in early learning and to working closely with Early Matters and others to identify the most important strategies the City can implement to expand access for families. This may include:

  • Expanding Head Start and partnering with HCS PreK to reach even more families 
  • Continuing support for the Quality Matters Fund to expand capacity and support at nonprofit and private early learning providers in high-needs neighborhoods
  • Expanding the provision of early learning scholarships for families that earn to much to receive childcare vouchers but for whom childcare is still unaffordable
  • Reforming the use of City tax incentives and PILOT agreements for employers to mandate support for thriving wage jobs and the support of early learning opportunities for working families

 

While there is much more that the City can do to better grow and support the ecosystem of high quality early learning opportunities, we know that a much more significant investment from the State will be required to fully address the access gaps in our community. As Mayor, I am committed to being a fierce advocate for increased early learning funding and I will convene business leaders and the Mayors of other cities across Tennessee to help make this a priority for State legislators.

 

Q: What steps do you support the City of Chattanooga taking to ensure students from low-income backgrounds and students of color have equitable access to out-of-school time programming and enrichment?

A: As one of the largest providers of youth programs in Chattanooga, the City has an opportunity to completely reimagine how we provide high-quality programming that helps kids reach their full potential. As Mayor, I will work closely with Chattanooga 2.0, HCS, and other nonprofit groups to ensure that the City is improving the quality and range of offerings for students that aligns with academic and career success. We will increase our investment in these programs and work to expand access to other high-quality programs – so that we truly have high-quality early learning opportunities in every neighborhood of the city.

Q: Do you believe educational equity, as defined by Chattanooga 2.0, should be a priority for the City of Chattanooga? If yes, what does that commitment look like in action?

A: Yes, educational equity must be a priority for the City of Chattanooga. Following is my policy framework for education, which was designed through an equity lens. This is not meant to be a white paper or action plan, but rather a policy framework I will use to establish policies and develop an action plan as mayor.

Education is the single most important issue for the social, cultural, and economic future of Chattanooga. A Chattanoogan’s zip code should not determine the quality of his or her educational opportunities, or their economic fate. The City of Chattanooga turned over its schools to the County 24 years ago, but the City must still play an important role in ensuring every family and child have access to an excellent education. We must embrace the City’s role in educating our children in order to move Chattanooga forward. 

Five Core Principles

  1. OPPORTUNITY – Every child must have opportunities to learn and grow. 
  2. EXCELLENCE – Chattanooga’s long-term success requires an education system that is excellent and effective from cradle-to-career. 
  3. ACCESS – A child’s zip code should not determine their future. 
  4. VOICE – The City of Chattanooga has an important role and voice in ensuring all children in our city have access to an effective and excellent education system. 
  5. PARTNERSHIP – A thriving educational system requires robust partnerships across our entire community, engaging businesses, non-profits, and local government.

Key Areas of Focus

  1. QUALITY PRE-K FOR ALL – A robust education system begins with early childhood education. 

○ The city does not currently fund K-12 education, but can and must play a larger role in preparing students to enter kindergarten. 

○ Better-prepared kindergarten students are more likely to excel and thrive throughout their educational journey. 

○ Brain development progresses at an accelerated rate in a student’s early years, as a city we must capitalize on this “golden window”. 

○ Children must learn their letters, numbers, colors and more before entering kindergarten in order to be prepared for the rigors of K-12. 

○ This not only ensures better outcomes for the child in question, but ALL children in reducing the stresses of remediation throughout the K-12 system. 

○ Parents also benefit from a robust Pre-K program because having access to affordable, accessible, quality early childhood education and childcare will allow them the flexibility to pursue their own educational and employment opportunities. 

  1. HEAD START – Children learn best early, through rich interactions with other adults and their peers in safe and positive learning environments. 

○ As one of the primary ways our city provides quality early childhood educational programming, Chattanooga’s next mayor must expand and refine this critical program. 

○ The city will raise the minimum wage for Head Start teachers to $15 per hour as part of the 100-day action plan. 

○ Expand access to Head Start to more children by partnering with nonprofit organizations to increase outreach and program scale. 

  1. COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS – An excellent early childhood education system engages partners across the entire community, working toward the same goal of ensuring every child has access to the resources they need to succeed and thrive. 

○ Partner with the Early Matters Coalition, a collection of 40 local organizations focused on early childhood education, to significantly increase the number of quality Pre-K seats and quality childcare facilities available to all Chattanogans. 

○ Reinforce and expand successful initiatives and programs throughout the city without duplicating existing efforts. 

○ Establish an education partnership with Hamilton County Schools and the Chamber of Commerce to jointly develop cradle to career pathways from poverty to opportunity. 

  1. SUPPORT HAMILTON COUNTY SCHOOLS – While the City does not currently fund K-12 education, the City of Chattanooga has an obligation to its parents and children to ensure each family has access to a great education.

○ Provide resources to schools located within the City of Chattanooga, including targeted investments coordinated with Hamilton County Schools to meet specific needs. 

○ Expand public transit coverage and options to better serve locations near Future Ready Institutes 

○ Partner with Hamilton County Schools to jointly drive appropriate resources toward the school district in partnership with officials across the state, and ensure accountability for those resources. 

○ Robust, accessible, and affordable Pre-K for all will ensure that students entering Hamilton County Schools are prepared for kindergarten and beyond. 

  1. SKILLED TRADES EDUCATION– Students who learn a trade can chart a path to a flourishing career and a successful future, rebuilding our middle class. ○ Commit City resources to complete the launch of the Building Trades Academy in partnership with Hamilton County Schools and other key public and private partners. 

○ Partner with trade organizations to develop successful apprenticeship programs across the city as a key component of a workforce development strategy. ○ Support Hamilton County Schools’ Future Ready Institutes. 

  1. ADVOCACY – Perhaps most importantly, the mayor of Chattanooga must be a strong, engaged advocate for better opportunities, options, and outcomes for children and families in our city. 

○ The Mayor will be the chief advocate for education in the city. 

○ Elevate the Office of Early Childhood Education to a full department focused on education policy, partnerships, and access. 

○ The Mayor will fight for a properly funded school system for Chattanooga families.

 

Q: What role should the City of Chattanooga, specifically, play in eliminating racial and socioeconomic disparities in resource allocation and access to high-quality learning options for children and youth, from birth to career?

A: See above policy framework for education. I have also released A Better Way Forward, which is specifically focused on eliminating racial and socioeconomic disparities in Chattanooga. https://www.kellyforcha.com/blog/a-better-way-forward

 

Q: How would you align the work of the City of Chattanooga to support Hamilton County Schools’ efforts to provide an excellent and equitable education to every student?

A: See above – Focus area 4 particularly describes partnership with Hamilton County Schools. But I will also work with Dr. Johnson and Hamilton County Schools on a regular basis to ensure that everything the City is doing with education, from birth to career, is coordinated with Hamilton County Schools.

 

Q: The annual economic loss in Chattanooga due to insufficient child care is $74 million. What would you do to address this? 

A: Universal Pre-K and increased support for Head Start plays a key role in strengthening our workforce and stemming economic losses due to childcare, both now and in the future. In addition to expanding educational opportunities and preparing our children for K-12 education, these programs give time back to parents that they can use to reintegrate into the workforce and pursue job opportunities. But beyond direct programs operated by the city, Chattanooga’s next mayor must be an effective orchestra conductor who can align with our vibrant nonprofit sector. As mayor, Tim Kelly will coordinate closely with organizations like the Chambliss Center for Children to ensure that residents have expanded access to affordable, 24/7 childcare. The combined effect of these programs will increase labor force participation and productivity, and help build wealth in our vulnerable communities.

 

Q: What steps do you support the City of Chattanooga taking to ensure students from low-income backgrounds and students of color have equitable access to out-of-school time programming and enrichment?

A: It is important for the City to lean in on out-of-school programming that is meaningful and coordinated with Hamilton County Schools. This includes funding summer enrichment programming, working with churches and other organizations to leverage existing virtual learning centers for out-of-school programming, and advocating for equitable access to programming and enrichment.

Q: Do you believe educational equity, as defined by Chattanooga 2.0, should be a priority for the City of Chattanooga? If yes, what does that commitment look like in action?

A: Yes educational equity should be a main priority and will be if I am elected Mayor. Equal opportunity is essential and that means we must recognize that a diverse group of students have different obstacles and needs. We as the city government must provide our children and their parents with the resources they need to succeed. I really admire Chattanooga 2.0 and will make sure they are adequately funded, supported and have 24/7 access to my staff and I.

 

Q: What role should the City of Chattanooga, specifically, play in eliminating racial and socioeconomic disparities in resource allocation and access to high-quality learning options for children and youth, from birth to career?

A: Early education is the sole responsibility of the city. We must do better as a city and not rely on the county to educate and care for our youth. I have proposed robust mentorship programs, better funding of after school programs, higher teacher and coach salaries, increased emphasis trade schools that teach marketable skills, more grants for female and minority owned businesses such as daycare centers, subsidizing day care for single Mothers, and promoting activities such as chess in the park, community live LatinX, hip hop, rock, African and country music as well as youth sporting events.

We must help and work closely with our youth and family development centers and provide them with more money and equipment and champion the Native American proverb that says “We don’t inherit the Earth from our ancestors we borrow it from our children”.

I have proposed a 10 cent plastic bag tax that has worked well in over 400 American cities in order to raise funds for early childhood education. It is a win win as it will also encourage people to use reusable canvas bags instead of plastic bags that pollute our environment and are non biodegradable. We will also target and aggressively go after anyone that harms our children. Childhood trauma is one of the most damaging problems in our society.

 

Q: How would you align the work of the City of Chattanooga to support Hamilton County Schools’ efforts to provide an excellent and equitable education to every student?

A: I am a bridge builder and will work synergistically with the generally more conservative county. I have already reached out to some school board members and county officials and our campaign’s progressive ideas and vision has a lot of mutuality with our counterparts in county government. I have a long history of forming alliances, encouraging altruism and promoting equity. We will include the county in every meeting and plan and ensure we have open positive communication with them. We will also stand up for the best interests of every resident in the city and not curtail to the county and state if it is necessary to hold our ground for the best interests of underserved Chattanoogans.

 

Q: The annual economic loss in Chattanooga due to insufficient child care is $74 million. What would you do to address this? 

A: I can not wave a magic wand and fix this problem over night. Anyone who says they can is being disingenuous. I plan on bringing auditors in the first day I am in office and going over where we can save revenue and better invest in our greatest resource our human beings.

I believe in assembling a team of my rivals if it makes sense to because some of political competition are the best and brightest minds.

We will get to the bottom of why this is happening and resolve it quickly and transparently. I believe that we must put humanity over greed and govern with humility and empathy. Chattanooga 2.0 can join our coalition and provide insight on what’s failing and what is succeeding and how our administration can do much better than the previous one. If this means I have to stay up all night crunching numbers with a team of niche experts then that’s what we will do to tackle this travesty head on expeditiously.

 

Q: What steps do you support the City of Chattanooga taking to ensure students from low-income backgrounds and students of color have equitable access to out-of-school time programming and enrichment?

A: This is a matter of caring or not caring. We will instantly green lighting programs that help rectify systemic issues and not just do the bare minimum for optics. We will make sure that we wage a war on poverty as it is the root cause of many of Chattanoogas problems such as education inequality, teen pregnancy, crime, homelessness and substance abuse. If I am elected Mayor I will work relentlessly to make sure every child has an equal opportunity and feels safe, protected and optimistic that the American Dream is achievable.

We can move mountains one stone at a time and will unite with the common purpose of moving forward in harmony. We will nurture sustainable communities every step of the way, cut through unnecessary bureaucratic red tape and closely advocate for people when they feel disenfranchised or confused by a seemingly apathetic municipal government. Working for our administration is a call to action and not an excuse to sit in a kiosk in city hall and collect a paycheck from tax payers. We will work until the job is complete and never surrender until we fully finish our mission which is to guarantee every Chattanoogan’s inherent human rights and essential dignity that are inalienable such as equitable education, health care, security and a livable wage.

I will be a Mayor that consistently and unconditionally goes to bat for all of our people. I will never forget where I came from and always stay focused on where we are going which will be to become the best ranked mid sized city in the United States of America.

“If you want to go fast go alone…if you want to go far go together” ~African Proverb

 

Q: Do you believe educational equity, as defined by Chattanooga 2.0, should be a priority for the City of Chattanooga? If yes, what does that commitment look like in action?

A: Yes; no issue is more fundamental to Chattanooga’s future than education. While specifically with policy that focuses on youth and education but ultimately a priority for all policies of my administration, we will work to remove barriers that limit our residents and create or maximize resources that best serve the needs of each neighborhood. This commitment is also rooted in developing strong partnership with Hamilton County schools and County government along with organizations like Chattanooga 2.0 to ensure that the supports, resources, and policies the City enacts are complementary to the larger work of education leaders in our community. And, I am committed to providing the time, staff, and financial resources it will take to provide educational equity for our students.

 

Q: What role should the City of Chattanooga, specifically, play in eliminating racial and socioeconomic disparities in resource allocation and access to high-quality learning options for children and youth, from birth to career?

A: First, this work begins with early learning and access to quality pre-K options. Whether through scholarships, expanding the capacity of existing learning centers, or partnering with private or faith based providers, children and families need access to quality early learning opportunities. And to do this equitably, resources will need to be deployed at different levels in different parts of our city to close gaps. During school aged learning, the City’s Youth and Family Development (YFD) Centers will be programmed with a curriculum that meets students’ needs depending on age and ability. These centers are strategically located within neighborhoods, and many are close to schools which help with access. However, the centers must be open and available when needed including after school, evenings, weekends, and during extended breaks. There will also be an investment in transportation so students can access facilities like the YFDs. In terms of a career, workforce development and training opportunities must begin well before high school graduations. We will work to establish and grow partnerships and opportunities with institutions like Chattanooga State Community College, the Future Ready Institutes, and private industry to not only expose students to career options but also give them training opportunities to come out of high school with needed and valuable skills to make a living wage. And again, the City will play a key role in transportation when it comes to making sure students can access these resources.

 

Q: How would you align the work of the City of Chattanooga to support Hamilton County Schools’ efforts to provide an excellent and equitable education to every student?

A: While the school system falls under Hamilton County, there is much the City can and must do to ensure that Chattanooga’s children succeed. We must leverage every relationship and every resource for our students.
With a focus on true collaboration, I will work with County and school leaders on a partnership that provides tangible and real support for their teaching efforts. While we will leave curriculum to the professionals, we will work with school leaders and private organizations to provide children and families support before and after school along with summer and break programming for Chattanooga’s students specifically utilizing our YFD Centers. As identified by education professionals, we will match the needs of the students to the offerings at these City facilities along with partnering on transportation as a coordinated effort to get students to safe, learning environments outside of their classrooms.


We face a major challenge in ensuring that Chattanooga’s children are prepared when they begin their formal education. With the City’s Office of Early Learning, we will work alongside the Early Matters Coalition to significantly increase the number of seats in quality Pre-K and childcare facilities because access and availability of childcare and early learning opportunities is an issue across our city.
All of this work will take dedicated City staff and resources, and this is a commitment that I am thrilled to make for the betterment of our students.

 

Q: The annual economic loss in Chattanooga due to insufficient child care is $74 million. What would you do to address this? 

A: In discussions with our local business community, we will advocate for businesses to work alongside working parents to offer childcare options and flexible schedules both as an economic investment and talent recruitment and retention strategy. And, the City will lead by example in this regard. We will also work with child care providers including operators that are private, faith based, nonprofit, and state sponsored to increase the number of reliable and affordable seats across our city. In addition, child care needs to be more than just standard operating hours to accommodate parents’ schedules who work varying shifts.

 

Q: What steps do you support the City of Chattanooga taking to ensure students from low-income backgrounds and students of color have equitable access to out-of-school time programming and enrichment?

A: YFD Centers will be more than a 9-5 operation. After school, evenings, weekends, and school breaks are critical times for the Centers to be open and offering programs and enrichment opportunities. These offerings must also be aligned with the school curriculum to maximize impact. To ensure students from low-income backgrounds and students of color have equitable access to out-of-school time programming and enrichment, I will also prioritize transportation so students can get to and from the YFD Centers. And as outlined in other questions, increasing seats and accessibility to quality child care and pre-k and equitable workforce training including transportation options are critical for students from low-income backgrounds and students of color to access these critical resources.

No responses were received from the following 2021 Chattanooga Mayoral candidates:

  • Monty Bell
  • Lon Cartwright
  • Christopher Dahl
  • D’Angelo Davis
  • Chris Long
  • George Ryan Love
  • Erskine Oglesby
  • Elenora Woods

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